Showing posts with label cloths. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cloths. Show all posts

2013/12/19

kinchaku bag

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more about fukuromono 袋物/ 嚢物 bags and pouches below
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kinchaku 巾着 drawstring bag、money pouch

some come with a bamboo bottom.


- source : www.face-p.com/30_TOKUSEN

to bring you good luck !

for takarabukuro 宝袋 "treasure bag"
and shinaibukuro 竹刀袋 - for bamboo sword, see below
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- quote
Kinchaku is a traditional Japanese purses or handbags. It is a small bag, typically with a drawstring.

Kin means fabric and Chaku means to put on. This small drawstring bag was invented to carry personal things such as money, one’s seal impression, a lucky charm, medicine, cigarette and cosmetics close to your skin. It also was used to carry Bento (lunch box) and utensils around.

In Edo Era, Kinchaku became a fashion icon in rich people and high-end Kinchaku were made by professional crafters by using leather, imported woolen cloth and silk. It was a primary accessory to carry around. When Meiji Period arrived, the life style gradually became westernized as Sakoku (locked country) policy has ended and foreigners were free to come into Japan and Japanese finally got permission from government to travel to oversea. People were rapidly fascinated with western cultures and the Kinchaku was replaced with other types of bags.
- source : www.designbyaika.com/sashiko


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- source : shopping.yahoo.co.jp/nadesiko/kazari

New Year Decoration and Good Luck !


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Daruma kinchaku bag, sold at the store
Echigoya in Edomura, Nikko

日光江戸村の越後屋さんでダルマさんの巾着袋を買いました。
source : ottaka.blog22

. Echigoya 越後屋 and Mitsui 三井 .

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. Bakuchi doogu 博打道具入れ gambling tools .


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- source : www.katsufujiya.com/

auspicious kinchaku for the New Year


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Photo from Nakamura Daruma san.

だるま巾着 Daruma Kinchaku sweets

. sweets from Kyoto .


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Nakatsu Town 中津市「くろかんくん巾着」kuro kan kun Kinchaku

In Memory of 2014
. Kuroda Kanbei Yoshitaka 黒田官兵衛 孝高 .


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CLICK for more samples!

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source : www.mingeijapan.com

- reference - kinchaku mingei bags

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fuku kinchaku mamori 福巾着守 
lucky Kinchaku bag clay bell

To keep the "money", this bell does not have an opening at the bottom and does not make a sound.



from the temple 鷲尾山興法寺 Hoko-Ji

. Amulets and Folk Art from Osaka .

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takarabukuro 宝袋 the treasure bag
as an art motive



. Hotei 布袋 Pu-Tai with the treasure bag .

Hotei is also called the ”Deity with the Treasure Bag” 宝袋尊.

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This bag often comes alone as a symbol for good luck and good business. May all the money gather in this bag.


. maneki neko, manekineko 招き猫 beckoning cat .




This treasure bag of the cat helps to win the lottery !

. takarakuji 宝くじ lottery .


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. hariko 張子 papermachee dolls .



A tiger embracing the treasure bag.

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. tsurushibina つるし雛 / 吊るし雛 small hanging hina dolls .



May the girl always have money in her purse and have a rich heart to embrace all good and bad things.

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. Hookaiji no takarabukuro omamori 宝戒寺の宝袋お守り - treasure bag talisman .
wooden votive amulets 板守 from temple Hokai-Ji, Kamakura, Kanagawa

. omamori 御守り amulets and talismans .



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shinaibukuro 竹刀袋 cover for a bamboo sword

with Daruma design


source : store.shopping.yahoo.co.jp/marusei


- quote
Shinai (竹刀) is a weapon used for practice and competition in kendo representing a Japanese sword. Shinai are also used in other martial arts, but may be styled differently from kendo shinai, and represented with different characters.
Not to be confused with bokken.
The word "shinai" is derived from the verb shinau (撓う), meaning "to bend, to flex", and was originally short for shinai-take (flexible bamboo). Shinai is written with the kanji 竹刀, meaning "bamboo sword", and is an irregular kanji reading.
In kendo, it is most common to use a single shinai, sometimes called itto style. Some kendoka choose to use two shinai.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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. Edo shokunin 江戸職人 craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .


CLICK for more photos of fukuro-mono !

fukuromonoshi 袋物師 / 嚢物師 making bags and pouches

They use mostly cloth and leather to produce all kinds of small pouches for the fashionable Edokko.
Most important were money pouches and tobacco pouches. They often worked by order from a client to suit his taste.



「印籠と根付」Inro and Netsuke
- Look at more photos on this page :
- source : blogs.yahoo.co.jp/rakutyu_netsuke -


fukuromonoya 袋物屋 shop for bags and pouches
fukuromono tonya 袋物問屋 pouches wholesaler

One of the most famous one's was Echikawa 越川.


. . . CLICK here for more Photos !

. tabako-ire 煙草入れ tobacco pouch .
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'囊物の世界 : 江戶小物のデザイン・百楽庵コレクション = The fukuro-mono of Edo : traditional small puches of old Japan / Fukuromono no sekai : Edo komono no dezain, Hyakurakuan korekushon = The fukuro-mono of Edo : traditional small puches of old Japan'
by Tomoyuki Yamanobe; Hideo Hirano; Takeshi Fujimori

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CLICK for more photos !

江戶に遊ぶ : 囊物にみる粋の世界
Edo ni asobu : fukuromono ni miru iki no sekai

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嚢物の世界 Fukuro-mono :
he All-Encompassing Art of Edo
by Hideo Hirano 平野英夫

目次 - contents
○, 序文 手作り細工品の極地
○, 図版 燧袋 合提げ 巾着 袂落し お守り
○, 煙草入れ
○, 紙入れ
○, 鏡入れ 筥迫 華鎖り
○, 動乱 手提げ袋 銭入れ 薬入れ 魚袋
○, 江戸の総合芸術ー袋物の世界とその周辺
○, 工芸家系譜図
○, 職方分業図ー袋物ができるまで
○, 袋物各部名称図ーたばこ入れ・筥迫
○, 用語解説

An extensive page including more photos and books:
日本嚢物史 History of Japanese Fukuromono
- Materials used: 材料
○, 皮革
○, 嚢物材料としての革
○, 織物
○, 染物
○, 刺繍
○, 摺込繪
○, 貴金属
○, 寳石と貴石
○, 準寳石
○, 人造装飾物
○, 木竹牙角

江戸に遊ぶ -嚢物にみる粋の世界-
日本のおしゃれ 袋物
江戸っ子
嚢物考古集
微古裳
名物裂 布久路
THE POUCHES AND HANDBAGS 袋物
- source : gobag.jugem.jp-


- reference : edo fukuromono -

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mimibukuro 耳袋 Mimi Bukuro, Mimi-Bukuro "Tales Heard"
Japanese Edo period anthology of oral tales

"Mimibukuro" is a book written by Moriyasu Negishi in the Edo-period. M. Negishi (1737-1815) was a magistrate in the city of Edo.

- quote -
Medical treatment and folk medicine recorded in "Mimibukuro"
He was very much interested in listening to and recording many kinds of the stories, which were told by various kinds of people, such as public officers, samurais, merchants, doctors, etc. Among the stories of this book, there are found some stories concerning folk medicine, medicinal substances and charms. In this report, I studied such kinds of the stories. As the results of my studies, I have shown that some medicinal stories originated in the old Chinese medical books.
Other stories were supposed to have been popular among the people of Edo.
- source : ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed -




耳囊で訪ねるもち步き裏江戶東京散步 根岸鎮衛「耳囊」で訪ねる
江戶東京の怪・奇・妖 /
Mimibukuro de tazuneru mochiaruki ura Edo Tōkyō sanpo :
Walking the backstreets of Edo with the Mimibukuro stories.


- quote -
The Evolution of Yōkai in Relationship to
the Japanese Horror Genre

Adam J. Johnson
Mimi bukuro
In 2007, popular mystery author Kyōgoku Natsuhiko attempted to adapt a collection of random stories known as the Mimi bukuro or Tales Heard into kaidan, tales of the strange and mysterious for today’s readership. ... Chapter two analyzes and compares four of the original stories from the Mimi bukuro to Kyōgoku’s adaptation to understand what was scary during the Edo period, and what Kyōgoku deemed frightening in modern times. ...
- source : scholarworks.umass.edu/masters-

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .
- Introduction -


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. Mingei 民芸 Japanese Folk Art .


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- #kinchaku #edobags -
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2009/08/26

Socks and Tabi

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. tabi 足袋 と伝説 Legends about Tabi socks .
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Socks and toe socks

These socks come in various traditional patterns and have the split toe for use with Geta clogs and Zori Sandals



. . . CLICK here for TABI Photos !

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tabi 単皮 (たび)were originally made of deer skin, the use of the Chinese characters 足袋 came later.
- another explanation
tabi 多鼻 "many noses", because the big toes stuck out like that.
The fore-runner of Tabi, the 下沓 / 襪 Shitauzu, were used by the aristocracy and soon made of silk, to keep the feet warm in winter.

Tabi (足袋)
are traditional Japanese socks. Ankle high and with a separation between the big toe and other toes, they are worn by both men and women with zori, geta, and other traditional thonged footwear. Tabi are also essential with traditional clothing—kimono and other wafuku. The most common colour is white, and white tabi are worn in formal situations such as at tea ceremonies.

Jika-tabi 地下足袋 Antique Japanese (samurai) armoured tabi
Construction workers, farmers and gardeners, rickshaw-pullers, and other workmen often wear a type of tabi called jika-tabi (地下足袋 tabi that contact the ground). Made of heavier, tougher material and often having rubber soles, jika-tabi resemble boots and are outer footwear rather than socks. Like other tabi, jika-tabi are toe-divided so they can be worn with slip-on thonged footwear. Shōjirō Ishibashi, the founder of major tire company Bridgestone Corporation, is credited with their innovation.
Though slowly being replaced by steel-toed rigid-sole construction shoes in some industries, many workers prefer them for the softness of their soles. This gives wearers tactile contact with the ground and lets them use their feet more agilely than rigid-soled shoes allow: for instance, people who traverse girders on construction sites like to know what is under their feet, and craft practitioners such as carpenters and gardeners additionally use their feet as if they were an extra pair of hands, for example to hold objects in place.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


- quote -
Traditional Japanese Footwear
- snip -
..... With all this footwear, one wears tabi socks, designed to be worn with thong toes, unless wearing a casual, cotton yukata kimono, in which case one does not wear tabi. Another exception is the waraji sandals, often worn without tabi, especially by workers in rural areas. The older style of tabi is non-stretch, with kohaze fasteners, and the more contemporary style is stretchy and without fasteners. Shoes are removed when entering a Japanese home; one walks on their scrupulously clean floors in one’s tabi socks or a pair of indoor tatami sandals. You can see tabi being worn in the photo at the very top of this footwear blog post, with the black zori.



You can also get knee high, stirrup stockings, a sort of leggins, called
脚絆 / 脚半 kyahan, to wear under tabi.
There is also other tabi toed footwear, such as jika-tabi, worn as outdoor tabi like ninja boots, worn in some martial arts or just worn casually. They are a 20th century creation. The example below is a pair of canvas, rubber soled tabi boots, with kohaze fasteners. Nike also recently produced a range of tabi toed trainer shoes and boots, called Nike Rifts, to introduce the acupressure effects of tabi toes to the sports trainer. .....
- source : wafuku.wordpress.com/2009 -

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Daruma Tabi Socks in three colors

CLICK for original LINK

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Daruma Tabi 達磨足袋

CLICK for original LINK

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Socks with five toes 五本指 ソックス
gohonyubi sokkusu

gohon-yubi no kutsushita 5本指の靴下



. . . CLICK here for Photos !


Toe socks
are socks that have been knitted so that each toe is individually encased the same way that fingers are individually encased in a glove.
All sock lengths are available as toe socks, from anklet and ankle socks through to knee-high and over-knee socks. They are also available with rubber soles.
Toe socks came into popularity in the 1970s and made a comeback in the 1990s as a novelty item worn by adolescents. These later socks are usually almost knee high, striped, and sometimes worn with flip-flops to make a fashion statement.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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Tabi toe boots
a kind of black shoe for workers, now fashionable with the young ones.
Some have quite a fancy design, click on the thumbnail below.




The inside of the tabi called Kin Kakuji (golden temple) boots have been lined with Japanese fabric showing off the Honmonoya red label and featuring daruma.
Daruma are Japanese wishing dolls.

CLICI for more

These tabi are made for dancing or funky street strolling!
www.tokyomade.com/blog/2008/11/


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H A I K U

kigo for all winter

tabi 足袋 (たび) Tabi socks
shirotabi 白足袋(しろたび)white tabi socks
kontabi 紺足袋(こんたび)blue tabi socks
irotabi 色足袋(いろたび)colored tabi socks

tabi arau 足袋洗う(たびあらう)to wash the tabi socks
tabi hosu 足袋干す(たびほす)to dry the tabi socks

. WKD : Warm Things in Winter


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kigo for all summer

natsu tabi 夏足袋 (なつたび) Tabi for summer
..... hitoetabi, hitoe-tabi 単足袋(ひとえたび)
Tabi for hitoe-summer robes


.SAIJIKI ... HUMANITY - Kigo for Summer  


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. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 (1715-1783) .

足袋はいて寝る夜物うき夢見哉
tabi haite neru yo monouki yumemi kana

Split-toe socks on,
I slept at night,
Dreaming a weary dream.


Tabi (足袋) is heavy-soled socks made with a split in the toe section between the big toe and second toe. (大英和)
According to Prof. Ogata, in Japan there used to be a saying,
"Go to bed with split-toe socks on,
and you won't be able to attend your parents' deathbed".

Now the saying may be said to be rather a superstition.
- - Impression:
Though he knew well what the old saying meant, the night was so cold that he could not help wearing split-toe socks in the bed. That night he did not sleep well, as the dream was very weary. He wonders whether, as the superstitious old saying goes, the tabi did disturb his usual sound sleep.
The Poet wrote the Haiku at the age of 53, 1768. Considering his age at death 68, 1783, the Poet was not so aged when he composed the Haiku. Mr. Takahashi comments that the Haiku expresses the lonely sleep of an elderly man leading a wretched life.
It can be safely accepted that the man in the Haiku is the Poet himself. His prolific periods started when he was 51, 1766. Two years later, at the age of 53, he must have been active and energetic in daily lives. I hardly agree to Mr. Takahashi's comment in this respect. It will be better to suppose that it was a terribly record cold night. Bare-foot in bed, he couldn't easily get to sleep and with split-toe socks on he happened to have a bad dream. He regretted a little that it was anything but a deep sleep. I think that his way of putting it comes close to expressing actual feelings of commoners as to how they spend a severely cold night.
- source : hokuoto77.com/buson-wi -


Wearing tabi socks
asleep in the melancholic night —
dreaming.


Tr. Allan Persinger

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男らの汚れるまへの祭足袋 
otokora no yogoreru mae no matsuri tabi 

these men's
festival tabi
before they get dirty


Iijima Haruko 飯島晴子  (1921 - 2000)

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浮世絵 Ukiyo-E motives on Tabi


CLICK for more photos !


. Edo shokunin 江戸職人 craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

The making of Tabi from cotton began in the Edo period after 1655. Before that they were made from leather and made by specialists 切皮屋 kirikawaya. They were quite expensive, but with the growth of the city population, the need for cheaper footwear became necessary. As cotton was grown more and more, the price for Tabi became reasonable.
They were made in white for women and black for men and they were not take off when entering a home.

tabiya 足袋屋 making tabi socks

Tabi are made of three pieces, the sole, the inpiece (inners) (usually white) and the outer piece (uppers), which soon became a popular fashion item in Edo. But the Tabi makers also sold other items, expecially men's underwear.
Since Tabi were only worn in the winter time, the Tabiya was a seasonal worker.
Poor folks in Edo did not use Tabi in any season, and the cheap prostitutes were not allowed to wear them at all. There are some Ukiyo-E paintings with barefeet girls in winter, eating soba 蕎麦 hot buckwheat soup by the roadside to keep warm.


source : s.webry.info/sp/rakugo-fan.at.webry.info
Shop sign of a Tabi store 足袋店看板 :
momohiki 股引 "men's underwear"


Tabi were made to order, so the Tabi maker first took measurements of the client's foot. Then he worked on a paper model. The various parts were then cut out with a special knife and sown together by hand. The toes parts were then stripped over a wooden board and hit with a mallet to make them soft.
The size of a Tabi is counted in MON 文, since it was measured by placing many MON coins side by side until the size was covered.


The ruler of a Tabi maker was called monshaku 文尺

- quote -
Bringing Japanese Tabi to the World
Each pair of pop tabi is carefully handmade by artisans. As there are many stages in the production process, it takes a long time to make a pair of tabi. Small pieces are stitched together to produce a durable and smooth tabi. Once the foot has been firmly placed inside a tabi, it is fastened with metal clasps called  小鉤 / 鞐/ 小鈎 “kohaze.”


About 80% of tabi in Japan used to be manufactured in 行田市 Gyoda City、Saitama. The footwear business for travelers flourished because of Gyoda City’s proximity to Nakasendo, one of the five highways of the Edo period and also because cotton – one of the main materials used to make tabi – was produced there.
At its peak,
there were almost 300 tabi makers there. But because the custom of wearing tabi was lost with the changing times, the number of tabi makers decreased so that these days there are only 11 remaining.
- source : deepjapan.org -


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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. tabi 足袋 と伝説 Legends about Tabi socks .

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2009/08/13

Furoshiki Cotton wrappers

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Cotton wrappers (furoshiki)

A piece of cotton cloth to wrap things, one of the most practical inventions.
They come in many shapes and decorations and are always a welcome present.






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A beckoning cat with Daruma




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Lines of small Daruma



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quote
Furoshiki (風呂敷)
are a type of traditional Japanese wrapping cloth that were frequently used to transport clothes, gifts, or other goods. Although possibly dating back as far as the Nara period, the name, meaning "bath spread", derives from the Edo period practice of using them to bundle clothes while at the sentō (public baths;public furo).
Before becoming associated with public baths, furoshiki was known as hirazutsumi (平包), or flat folded bundle. Eventually, the furoshiki's usage extended to serve as a means for merchants to transport their wares or to protect and decorate a gift.

Modern furoshiki can be made of a variety of cloths, including silk, chirimen, cotton, rayon, and nylon. Furoshiki are often decorated with traditional designs or by shibori. There is no one set size for furoshiki, they can range from hand sized to larger than bed-sheets. The most common sizes are 45cm (17.7 inch) and 68-72cm (26.7-28.3 inch).

Although there are still furoshiki users in Japan, their numbers declined in the post-war period, in large part due to the proliferation of the plastic shopping bag. In recent years, it has seen a renewed interest as environmental protection became a concern. Furoshiki are, however, commonly used to wrap and transport lunch boxes (bento) and often double as a table mat for the lunch.

On March 6, 2006, the Japanese Minister of the Environment, Yuriko Koike, created a furoshiki cloth to promote its use in the modern world.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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How to use Furoshiki



Ministry of the Environment Government of Japan
source : www.env.go.jp/en/focus

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The most common pattern for Edo furoshiki:
. karakusa 唐草 / からくさ Karakusa art motives .
karakusa moyoo 唐草模様 Karakusa pattern. Karakusa arabesque
Chinesischen Arabesken und Rankenornamente


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From Kenema



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King Daruma and the Big Furoshiki

http://ameblo.jp/036company/entry-10665709546.html


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Hankerchief ハンカチ hankachi



. . . CLICK here for Photos !



Click for many more bautiful souvenir furoshiki!
source : mingeijapan

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gamakuchi, gamaguchi がま口 purse
lit. "mouth of a toad"









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. . . CLICK here for Photos !



NHK Bi no Tsubo - file267 「がま口」
美しいがま口は美しく響く it has to make a nice sound
歴史ががま口を包み込む There is the history of the maker
共に時を刻む Get old with it together!

source : www.nhk.or.jp/tsubo





. Purses from 畳の縁 tatami heri border brocade .

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CLICK for more samples with Ukiyo-E prints !

. Ukiyo-E and Edo Culture .

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Japanese Reference


 WASHOKU
Furoshiki with Kyoto vegetable patterns



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H A I K U


みんみんの峠を越えし風呂敷よ
minmin no tooge o koeshi furoshiki yo

I crossed the pass
with the minmin cicadas -
oh this furoshiki !


Kunitake Izayoi 国武十六夜
Tr. Gabi Greve


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moon flower
I wrap my dreams
in furoshiki


Shared by Stella Pierides
Joys of Japan - Poetry

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ginza memories
live in the linen drawer
furoshiki


Shared by Elaine Andre
Joys of Japan - Poetry


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Edo Patterns on Cotton

. fukusa 袱紗 small crape wrapper cloth .
for the tea ceremony


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